No room for faith alone

Is that an echo I hear?  Oh right, it must be that time of year again for Club Med development and Dr. Brown is once again trumpeting the proposed success of yet another developer.  While I am pleased to hear that something is happening, excuse me if I sit amongst the pessimists who listened to Dr. Brown the last time when we switched developers from Quorum to KJA all while he was trumpeting KJA as the people to get it done.   As the saying goes, “fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me”.   At last report, Quorum is still waiting to find out why exactly they were turned down at the last minute in favor of KJA.  Why was that again?

“The pessimists among you will say: ‘So what, there have been others who said they were going to build.’ I appreciate and understand your pessimism, but let me tell you I made a commitment: in 2007, construction will begin on the new hotel in St. George’s. I can promise you it will be delivered.

I wouldn’t say there have been others who said they were going to build, I would rather say there have been others who were willing and capable, but were replaced by those trumpeted as so but clearly proved otherwise.  One also couldn’t bother holding Premier Brown to his promise for very simply it only requires the laying of a couple blocks in a row and calling it a wall to pass for “construction”.  Hell, we could have had that the whole time.

Tell you what.  I’ll make a promise of my own.  I promise that I’ll believe it when I see it.

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De Onion
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The real pesimists ask “What’s the opportunity cost of two decades of undeveloped Bermuda land with a large eyesore on it… and also “How much would that land be worth if we were to sensibly subdivide it into small lots, park, and commercial areas to allow the Town of St. George’s to be expanded onto that land, complete with modern small lanes and cute houses. Urban village style… except of course… just another village, complete with fast ferry service down North Shore (which is where the St. George’s Ferry should leave anyway to be fast enough to compete with car… Read more »

De Onion
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…and nobody wants that, because it robs the politicians of a political point scoring and a photo opportunity. Which, let’s face it, is what really matters.

Denis Pitcher
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De Onion,
I’d agree with you if you were referring to southlands. I would rather see that turned into a mix of urban living and parks that best utilized the space.
As for Club Med, I’m still on board with it being turned into a decent hotel.

De Onion
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The advantage of Club Med site vs. Southlands is that it has the non-road links to the City of Hamilton in the form of a fast, convenient ferry route that could replace St. George’s, as well as continuing the general urban pattern of the town St. George’s… which is one of Bermuda’s true wonders in terms of being aesthetically pleasing for visitors as well as a really nice place to live. The question that needs to be asked is “What’s the value added by a hotel in St. George’s? – As far as I can see it’s pretty minimal since… Read more »

Sal
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Electioneering Bullshit,it’s NOT a hotel,it’s a sell off of Bermuda’s land,as is Tucker’s Point ,Coco Reef,Newstead,Invururie,Belmont,Loughlands,Mermaid,Lantana,Bermudiana,
and worst of all Southlands.
Double talking nonsense: if the fools who vote El Duce in think roads and housing is at a crisis now, wait a few years when thousands more expats flood the market.They get the government their greed and stupidity deserves.

Wensleydale
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Wensleydale

Onion I sort of half agree with you. The East end of the island is underdeveloped, but I can’t help thinking its just not the right place to solve Bermuda housing problem. The housing crisis in Bermuda isn’t just about a shortage of housing. It’s also about a shortage of a type of housing. The population demographic of the island has changes. People are having fewer children and later in life. The term rule mean more of the expats are childless twenty somethings. These two issues create a high demand for studio/one bed flats. But developers have no interest in… Read more »